Courseulles-Sur-Mer

Courseulles-Sur-Mer

Courseulles-sur-Mer Beach

More than 14,000 Canadians stormed the 8-kilometre (5.0 mi) stretch of beach between Graye-sur-Mer and St. Aubin-sur-Mer on 6 June 1944. They were followed by 150,000 additional Canadian troops over the next few months. Canadian soldiers of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade, which formed the Canadian assault force on Juno Beach suffered 1074 casualties, including 369 killed on the beach and in the countryside on the first day of the invasion. The Canadians reached almost 10 km (6.2 mi) inland on the first day of fighting, the farthest advance of any of the Allied landing forces. The Canadian military cemetery of Bény-Reviers is the resting place of 2,043 Canadians and 1 Frenchman. The land for this cemetery was donated by France to the Government of Canada after the Second World War and lies 4 km (2.5 mi) inland from Courseulles-sur-Mer just off Route 79.

The Juno Beach Centre is a museum located at Courseulles-sur-Mer, at the head of the Juno invasion beach on which 14,000 Canadian troops landed on D-Day 6 June 1944. The museum opened on the 6 June 2003, the 59th anniversary of the D-Day landings.


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